Fun Facts About Bananas

I've put together this page of little known and fun facts about bananas to answer all your most pressing banana questions. Questions like:



Banana bunches on a plant with the flower stalk still attached.

  • Do bananas cure hangovers?
  • Do bananas have seeds?
  • Why do bananas turn brown?
  • You know, everything you always wanted to know about bananas but were afraid to ask. Or maybe afraid somebody would answer.

    Let's begin with the most important question of all:


    Will bananas cure hangovers?

    Nothing but time will cure a hangover. But a banana might help to settle your stomach after a wild night. It also makes a nice quiet breakfast.

    Can you eat too many bananas?

    Yes. If you do, they'll act as a stool softer.

    Are bananas binding?

    No. Just the opposite. See the previous question.

    Do bananas grow on trees?

    No. Bananas develop on fast-growing herbaceous plants. Some of them reach tree-like heights of 15 to 25 feet. The thing that makes them a plant and not a tree is that a banana's trunk never becomes woody.

    Do bananas have seeds?

    Some do, but it's unlikely that you would ever encounter one. There are many different types of bananas. Some are grown for their delicious fruit. Others are grown for their beautiful blooms which are used in the cut flower industry. Some of these ornamental bananas produce small inedible fruit which contains hard black seeds. Edible bananas do not contain seeds.

    Why do bananas turn brown?

    For much the same reason that metal rusts. Because of a chemical reaction between the oxygen in the air and an enzyme in the fruit.

    Are there only yellow bananas?

    Red bananas growing on a potted plant.

    These red bananas are growing on a potted plant at Selby Gardens in Sarasota, Florida.

    No. Besides yellow bananas there are also red and green bananas . Red bananas are smaller than the yellow bananas you see in the stores. It is only the skin that is red. The flesh varies from white to pale pink.

    Green bananas are simply unripe yellow bananas. Contrary to popular belief they are perfectly edible. Just don't eat them raw. Green bananas can be cooked like plantains. They are starchy and firm like potatoes.

    In Kenya--where potatoes don't grow, but bananas are plentiful--they make green banana fries. Here's the recipe:

    1. Peel 5 or 6 green bananas. Use a knife if you need to.
    2. Slice them into thin wedges or strings.
    3. Heat an inch of peanut or olive oil in a large skillet.
    4. Sprinkle the fries with salt and pepper.
    5. Fry until golden and drain on paper towels.
    6. Reseason if necessary and serve with ketchup.


    How do bananas reproduce?

    Stand of bananas in our yard.

    All these bananas growing in my yard came from one plant.

    If the underground portion of the banana is not killed by a hard freeze, it will continue to grow and send up suckers. This corm will become very large in time.

    I planted one banana plant in my yard and I soon had a stand of bananas. I cut a couple of the suckers off the edge of the stand and planted them in different spots. I now have several stands, or groups, of bananas.

    Where are most bananas found?

    In the supermarket.

    Sorry, I couldn't resist.

    Bananas are a staple food in many tropical countries. Almost 25% of the bananas in the world are grown and eaten in India. Brazil is the second biggest banana growing country in the world. Followed by China.

    I hope you've enjoyed these fun facts about bananas.

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